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May 05, 2016

Chateau Pavie 2010

pavie1

Chateau Pavie 2010 - 100 Pts Parker

6×75 – £1,520 IB
£1,838.98 incl duty and VAT

Ex-Chateau Stock

Since their promotion to Premier Grand Cru Classe A in September 2012, Angelus and Pavie have seen an incredible ascent. The Bordelaise have begun to cement them under the term First Growth, with Ausone, Cheval Blanc, Angelus and Pavie becoming the First Growths of the right bank. Subsequently their prices and cachet have risen to the levels of Haut Brion, Margaux, Latour, Mouton Rothschild and Lafite Rothschild. A new generation will build cellars and rightly view these nine Chateau as the First Growths, just as Mouton Rothschild promotion in 1973 is now set in stone.

Since their promotion the average vintage price of Chateau Pavie has risen 30% and Angelus 28%, a marked increase, while the other left bank First Growths have fallen. The average case price over the last ten years for Pavie is £2,100, and Angelus £2,500. In contrast the average case price for Cheval Blanc is £4,400 and Ausone £5,800. Indeed, over the same time period Robert Parker has awarded an average score of 95 to Angelus, 94.5 to Cheval Blanc, 96 to Pavie and 96.5 to Ausone. There is a clear price arbitrage to be benefited from as Pavie and Angelus catch-up the ground on Ausone and Cheval Blanc.

Pavie has been the most successful Chateau in terms of perfect scores; it is the only First Growth on the right or left bank to have been awarded 100 points in 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2010, an incredibly telling statistic. This year Robert Parker has announced that he will fully retire from scoring Bordeaux, leaving Chateau Pavie to bask in the glory of the last 15 years and the unmatched accolades lavished on it by Parker.

In 2010 price disparity is startlingly clear. Once again, Pavie is trading at an attractive discount to the other 100 point scoring First Growths. It is therefore due a correction over the next five years, as Pavie’s price moves into line with its status.

Chateau Parker 6×75
Latour 100 £4,950
Cheval Blanc 100 £3,800
Haut Brion 100 £2,950
Pavie 100 £1,520

In 2010 Robert Parker’s tasting note is extraordinary, suggesting Pavie has the potential to age into 2100, to improve in bottle for 85 years! ‘This wine is truly profound Bordeaux. Everything is in place – remarkable concentration and a beautiful nose of cedar and ripe blackcurrant and blackberry with some kirsch and spice box in the background. Lavishly rich, with slightly more structure and delineation than the more Rabelaisian 2009, this wine does show some serious tannins in the finish, and comes across as incredibly youthful’. Moreover, Parker calls Pavie ‘one of Bordeaux’s greatest terroirs, of largely limestone and clay soils.’ He goes further to say ‘Pavie potentially rivals nearby Ausone, the oldest and possibly the most famous estate in Bordeaux’. Pavie today is de facto a First Growth and will continue to make up ground on Ausone and Cheval Blanc.

The 2010 trades today at a 25% discount to the 2000 vintage, which continues to provide excellent value for £4,000 per case. As such, Pavie 2010 is set to benefit from an overall price repositioning, a vintage disparity and benefit from vintage premium. It is also, in the eyes of Parker, one of the most incredible wines made in his tasting career! Our stock today is offered at the lowest price in the market and direct from the Chateau!

What makes Pavie Special
Like other vineyards in Saint-Emilion such as Château Ausone, the Pavie vineyard dates back to Roman times. It takes its name from the orchards of peaches (“pavies”) that used to stand there. The modern estate was assembled by Ferdinand Bouffard in the late 19th century by buying plots from several families. The plots were still managed separately, and the 9 hectares bought from the Pigasse family retained a separate identity as Château Pavie-Decesse. However, Bouffard struggled in the vineyard with phylloxera, and at the end of World War I he sold it to Albert Porte, who sold it to Alexandre Valette in 1943. His grandson, Jean-Paul Valette sold it to Gérard Perse in 1998 for $31 million.

Perse is a Parisian millionaire and former cyclist who sold two supermarket chains to fund his entry into the wine business. He bought Château Monbousquet in 1993, Château Pavie-Decesse in 1997, and Pavie in 1998. He ripped out most of the old equipment, building new temperature-controlled wooden fermentation vats, a new cellar, and a new irrigation system in the vineyard.

Chateau Pavie 2010 is one of Bordeaux’s greatest ever efforts and truly a wine for the ages.

Robert Parker, 100 Points  
What fun, excitement and joy it will be to compare the four perfect wines Perse has made in 2005, 2009, 2010 and, of course, the 2000, in 25 or so years. This wine is truly profound Bordeaux. Everything is in place – remarkable concentration and a beautiful nose of cedar and ripe blackcurrant and blackberry with some kirsch and spice box in the background. Lavishly rich, with slightly more structure and delineation than the more Rabelaisian 2009, this wine does show some serious tannins in the finish, and comes across as incredibly youthful. Of course, it’s five years old, but it tastes more like a just-bottled barrel sample than a 2010. In any event, this wine is set for a long, long life and should be forgotten for at least another decade. Consume it over the following 75 or more years.

To buy this wine please reply to this email or telephone +44 (0)203 195 8055. Offer subject to availability.